— Seventh graders volunteered sorting out food at Coastside Hope

Coastside Hope Coastside Hope Coastside Hope Coastside HopeThe 7th grade visited Coastside Hope’s warehouse on Tuesday, June 6th. The purpose of the visit was to unload and sort over 35 barrels of food. The students worked tirelessly pulling barrels off pallets, emptying those barrels onto tables, and checking dates on all of the products they were sorting. Overall it was a very productive day. It was a collective effort with each student doing their best and using their strengths to help each other. With all of their hard work, Coastside Hope will now be able to hand out the food to families in need on the Coast.

 

Here is just some of what the students took away from this field trip…

“Fun, nice to help. It was hard work”
~Callisto

“ It was inspiring to see how much would or could get done as a group. It helped us work together and collectively collaborate”
~Shea

“It felt good that every can I packed helped a family”
~Mari

“It made me feel good because I was helping people who may have less than me”
~Ryan M.

 


 

— In the News: Coastside kids help give hope to those in need

Students from Sea Crest School gathered at Coastside Hope recently to prepare hygiene products for delivery to those in need. Sarah Griego Guz / Review

Published in the Half Moon Bay Review on May 23rd.

Students pack hygiene products for Coastside Hope. By Sarah Griego Guz.

Sixth-grade students from Sea Crest School gathered outside Coastside Hope’s warehouse in Princeton on May 17 with a clear purpose in mind. For over a month, the civic-minded children had been doggedly collecting hygiene supplies for needy families. This was the day that they would package the supplies into “kits” so that they could be given to people in need.

As they stood around a horseshoe of work tables, the students listened as Coastside Hope’s Community Development Director Keith Terry provided insight.

Terry explained that Coastside Hope was started in 1976 and is now considered to be a core agency within San Mateo County.

“Coastside Hope takes care of the Midcoast, which is basically Montara down to La Honda,” said Terry, addressing the students. “Last year we gave away 450,000 pounds of food. That’s a lot of pounds. We gave away food to about 3,400 people.

“Summertime is when we run short on food, because in November and December everyone donates food,” he continued. “And then we put that on our pantry shelves and we give it away. Then our next big dose is what we just got, the 35 barrels from the Postal Workers drive, and then, there’s not a really big one until the Boy Scout drive. And guess what? That’s in the autumn too.”

Properly educated, the students set to work unpacking the hygiene products. They labored together in groups. There were animated discussions as to the best way to accomplish their goal.

“We’re organizing all the hygiene products,” said Ben Cleary as he packed a gallon-sized bag with toothpaste and shampoo.

“We’re sorting them and organizing them into packs to give them to people so they can use them,” added Luke Aranda. “We try to maximize what we put in each pack, so usually they have some basic supplies that people might need at home, like deodorant, toilet tissue, shampoo and conditioner.

“Some other necessities that some homeless people might need are like a can opener,” he continued. “Which is very important when they get food, because if they don’t have a can opener they can’t eat the food.”

“The most needed product, surprising when you’re dealing with food, especially with a homeless person, is a can opener,” said Terry. “Can openers are really important, especially for a homeless person because they lose them and then can’t get into their food.

“As far as specific food items, we always need soups, breakfast cereals and oatmeal,” he continued. “We always need basic staples like oil, flour, sugar, things like that that people can turn into food, so they can make their own bread, their own tortillas. They make things out of that.”

Terry also stated that cake mixes are always welcome as well as any food staples.

Because of the influx of food resulting from Letter Carriers’ Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive, Terry estimates their supplies will last one or two months.

“We always welcome food donations, regardless of the time of the year,” he stated. “Fresh produce, if someone has a backyard tree (and) they want to pull their lemons down, those go really fast.”

In addition to food donations, neighbors wishing to support the safety net programs at Coastside Hope are invited to attend the annual barbecue scheduled from 5 to 8 p.m. on June 21 at Mavericks Event Center. Tickets go on sale in early June and will cost $40 to $50 at the door.

For more information, visit coastsidehope.org.

 


 

— In the News: Sea Crest kids come clean for good cause

Published in the Half Moon Bay Review on April 19th, 2017.

 

By Sarah Griego Guz.

Sixth-grade students at Sea Crest School were hard at work in their Health and Wellness classes the week before spring break.

Colorful handmade posters announcing the upcoming hygiene drive fanned out across work tables as students concentrated on adding lettering to cardboard boxes.

Hudson Webster hoisted a cardboard box with the words “Hygiene Drive” inscribed across the surface. It was punctuated with smiley faces.

“We are bringing this box to the fourth-grade class for the hygiene drive,” he said. “It’s so they can put all the donated items in there.”

Now in its third year, the hygiene drive offers something good for all involved. The students collecting the donations are flexing their organizational, communications and leadership skills while Coastside Hope benefits by receiving the items collected during the drive.

“A lot of people, when they donate, they donate clothing or food,” said sixth-grade student Carla Roberts. “They forget about hygiene even though it’s necessary for staying healthy, so we’re trying to raise awareness for that.”

The hygiene drive goes hand-in-hand with what the students are learning in class.

“It’s great, because it fits into the curriculum and they are giving back,” said Director of Physical Education Katie Moore. “In class, the students are learning about deodorant and bacteria. We also talk about how in some schools there are kids who are unable to come to school with clean clothes.

“That’s the thing that we talk about here, what’s it like to only have five things, a pair of shoes, a shirt, underwear and have to wear those same things to school every day,” she continued. “Nobody here knows what that’s like, but there are many families in our community that do, and they may not have laundry detergent because they need to use that money for food or to pay a bill.”

Their mission clear, the students were divided into groups and set out to accomplish a laundry list of tasks, including creating an online form so members of the community could sign up to donate specific items.

“You feel like you’re doing something for people,” said Kaylani Guevara. “It just feels good.”

The students are hoping others in the community will donate to the worthy cause.

In addition to soap, toothpaste and toothbrushes, they are hoping to collect items such as deodorant, face wash, mouthwash, shampoo, conditioner, combs, hair brushes, razors, shaving cream, foot powder, lotion, sunblock, Q-tips, tweezers, nail clippers, laundry soap, wash cloths and towels.

The deadline for donations is April 28. For more information email Katie Moore at kmoore@seacrestschool.org.


— Service Learning

By Wendy Connolly, Seventh & Eighth Grade History Teacher

Service learning is an important component to the eighth-grade History curriculum. The theme this year is Hunger and Poverty. Students started out learning about causes of hunger, Federal poverty lines, state poverty lines and how that compares globally.

Eighth graders did their first service at the San Francisco Food Bank where they learned about the issues of food insecurities in San Francisco and how food banks help. Each year the food bank distributes over 48 million pounds of food to over 225,000 people in San Francisco and Marin. Our students worked for four hours separating oranges. In the end, we boxed 25,000 pounds of citrus. It was a wonderful feeling and we all had fun doing it. If you are interested in working at the San Francisco Food Bank, go to their website. Families with children as young as 5 can volunteer.

Coastside-HopeThe eighth graders are currently working on Coastside Hope, Adopt a Family program. This year Sea Crest is adopting 10 families that are in need of clothes, toys and household items for this upcoming holiday season. Each eighth grader is connected with a grade level class and an adopted family from the coastside. Students are responsible for setting up all the items being asked for, meeting with teachers and classes to explain the program and organizing the items to be taken to Coastside Hope.

Each year it is wonderful to see the generosity and support of Sea Crest families for this local, charitable program!

 


 

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