— Seventh graders volunteered sorting out food at Coastside Hope

Coastside Hope Coastside Hope Coastside Hope Coastside HopeThe 7th grade visited Coastside Hope’s warehouse on Tuesday, June 6th. The purpose of the visit was to unload and sort over 35 barrels of food. The students worked tirelessly pulling barrels off pallets, emptying those barrels onto tables, and checking dates on all of the products they were sorting. Overall it was a very productive day. It was a collective effort with each student doing their best and using their strengths to help each other. With all of their hard work, Coastside Hope will now be able to hand out the food to families in need on the Coast.

 

Here is just some of what the students took away from this field trip…

“Fun, nice to help. It was hard work”
~Callisto

“ It was inspiring to see how much would or could get done as a group. It helped us work together and collectively collaborate”
~Shea

“It felt good that every can I packed helped a family”
~Mari

“It made me feel good because I was helping people who may have less than me”
~Ryan M.

 


 

— Another year of making History

By Wendy Connolly, 7th & 8th History Teacher.

This trimester, 7th grade history is focusing on Medieval Japan and Imperial China. Currently, students are in Japanese clans for a simulation entitled, “Warlords of Japan”. Each clan strategizes to take over provinces and castles all while feeding the people in their provinces and armies. To earn koku or rice, students show honor and calm all while collaborating with their fellow teammates, research topics students have chosen, surprise attacks by answering questions, study samurai, and like good samurai create Haiku poetry. A field trip to the Asian Art Museum where students analyzed primary artifacts on samurai along with a trip to the largest Chinatown outside of China with lunch rounded out their study of China and Japan.

The 8th graders are currently studying the causes of The Civil War, the war itself and Reconstruction this trimester. They will be creating a Civil War “museum” that will be dedicated to the Civil War through different lenses. Using primary and secondary sources, students will take an event and explore the perspectives of multiple people and their interpretations of each event.

Towards the end of the year, each 8th grader writes a letter to their future selves to create a primary source of information that will be mailed to them when they graduate from high school. It is a look into the past, what their interests were, goals, and what was happening in the world as they head off to college and beyond. This year’s graduating seniors will be receiving their letters shortly and they can be reminded of what their life was like as an 8th grader and the simpler times.

 


 

— Managing our middle schoolers’ screen time and use

By Jessica Patti, Director of Middle School

Our Middle Schoolers are digital natives – they have grown up immersed in technology. However, our students’ familiarity with technology may unintentionally mask their need for guidance with how to engage appropriately with peers in ways that support boundaries and maintain personal integrity. Among Snapchat, messaging, Instagram, and group texting (or grext) there are a myriad of ways for students to connect with one another and share (at times near constant) communication.

While our students are growing up in a social construct that invites sharing profusely, the screen (vs face-to-face) simultaneously creates enough separation such that students’ inhibitions are lessened. This results in exchanges that would be deemed “over-sharing” in person, but are socially acceptable when sent electronically. Middle School is also the time when many parents are grappling with providing a personal device to their child and then with how to monitor use while supporting the emerging adolescent need for perceived “space” and personal privacy.

Here are some helpful tips and things to think about for navigating these sometimes tricky waters:

  • Have regular conversations with your child(ren) about social media.
  • Find out about the new apps they are using and how they are being used.
  • Ask your child to share current examples of how they have recently communicated.
  • Ask if your child has ever had interactions with others on social media that made them uncomfortable and why.

Create clear parameters around social media use:

  • Tell your child what you think is and isn’t appropriate to say and do online. (A helpful framework: If it would be uncomfortable in person, it should not happen on social media.)
  • Explain the difference between bystander and upstander. A bystander may “like” or “favorite” something hurtful an upstander calls out cruel and hurtful behavior and supports targeted students.
  • Let your child know if they may not use certain apps or sites.

Limit access to the device; students should not have cell phone and computer access 24 hours a day.

  • Set a time when you take the device in the evenings and when it is returned in the mornings.
  • Charge personal devices outside of student bedrooms.

Create clear expectations about the expectation of privacy.

  • Have students work on the computer in a communal space in your home.
  • As parents you should decide how frequently you will check the phone.
  • Go through phones and computers together with your child(ren) and talk about topics as they arise.
  • Always ask about new apps or apps you don’t recognize.
  • Have your child(ren) share all passwords for phones, computers and apps.
  • For more extensive resources, Common Sense Media has wonderful information.

For more extensive resources, please visit other related articles from our Parent Education Series: Parenting in a Digital Age, and more to come!


 

— Annual science festival is a hit

What an amazing time at the Science Festival this week! Seventh graders showed their hard work: researching, hypothesizing, designing and conducting experiments, and proudly displayed their individual science projects. This year, there were 39 projects and a number of engaging hands-on science activity stations and demonstrations for the entire family. Once again, Sea Crest’s Science Festival was a fantastic occasion to celebrate science and learning!

Science Festival Science Festival Science Festival Science Festival Science Festival Science Festival Science Festival Science Festival

Thanks to all parents for volunteering and attending this event, but also for supporting our Seventh Grade students — Stay tuned for the results!


 

— In the News: Challenge within a chair’s construction

The Half Moon Bay Review published an article about our seventh graders’ project in the Innovation Lab: Challenge within a chair’s construction: Educator looks at everyday objects in a different way. They prototyped four chairs out limited materials as part of their Explorations and the results were remarkable.

Sea Crest School students were recently challenged to think outside the box — outside the cardboard box, to be exact.

As part of a semester-long exploration class, aspiring makers were required to enhance an old office chair using nothing more than masking tape, cardboard and hot glue.

The lesson took place in the Innovation Lab, a maker-space where tinkering is not only encouraged, it is expected.

“During the summer, I saw a lot of old chairs in the hallway that were going to be thrown out,” said Patrick Neary, Innovation Lab manager at Sea Crest School. “There was a lot of cardboard that was also going to be thrown out. I thought maybe there was a way to upcycle both slightly and see what we could do with them.

“It occurred to me that the curved, rotating chair was a common thing, almost in contrast with these big square boxes,” he continued. “One of the things that I was concerned with was challenging the kids about their basic assumptions about things.”

Before the course, most students would look at the chair and disregard it as a utilitarian object. After completing the project, it was clear that the students would no longer take the art of sitting for granted.

Innovation Lab Chair“To get started, the kids had to think about how does this chair come about?” said Neary. “Once they re-examined this common object, they could start to reinvent it.”

Part of that process included deconstructing a few samples in order to gain a clear understanding of how the chair worked.

Innovation Lab Chair“Some of the students used power tools, like drills, to pull out the screws,” said Neary. “The students then had to figure out how many screws were used and why.”

Once the kids understood how the chair worked, they were challenged to improve upon the design. Neary created four teams. Students drew lots to determine who was in each group.

“It was random,” said Neary. “Some students liked the partners they were grouped with, others had never really talked before as partners.”

The newly created groups started sketching out their ideas as they began working to build a better chair.

Once the drawing was complete, the makers-in-the-making moved into the physical world of construction.

“The students experienced obstacles of different viewpoints and agendas that required that the students collaborate, negotiate and corporate,” said Neary.

The students worked hard on their final designs, pieces of cardboard that were held together with nothing more than masking tape and hot glue.

The groups then presented their projects to a panel of judges that assessed the projects on the basis of collaboration, the mindful use of the materials, the overall design aesthetic, and the cleanliness of the final construction.

There was also one more catch, the completed prototype had to support the weight of the intended user, whether a student or an adult.

The results were stunning to say the least. One group opted for a minimalistic design going heavy on the masking tape. The end product was a sleek chair sure to hold up under the average adult. Others were more creative, adding butterfly wings, cup holders, and slots for books.

 

Footer background
901 ARNOLD WAY | HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019
CONTACT US
650.712.9892
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR COMMUNITY NEWSLETTER
Sea Crest School is nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, employment practices and all other operations. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, citizenship, national or ethnic origin gender, sexual orientation, or gender identification in the administration of our educational policies, admission policies, tuition assistance programs and athletic or other school-administered programs. © 2016 SEA CREST SCHOOL
Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Linkedin