— Seventh grade winner at the California State Science Fair

Seventh Grade student Olivia Cevasco won the 3rd place prize in the Junior Division Mammalian Biology Category at the 2017 California State Science Fair for her project, “Diabetes, A Bloody Mess: Non-Invasive Glucose Testing.” The 2017 California State Science Fair took place on April 24-25 at the California Science Center on the campus of USC. Prior to this achievement, Olivia also received the 1st place award in the Biological Systems category at the San Mateo County Science Fair. 

Congratulations, Olivia! We are really proud of you!

 


 

— Walk in my shoes and you’ll know that…

As part of their Character Education curriculum, fifth-grade students shared their personal stories with the school. As they transition to middle school, their footsteps in the hallway enabled us to walk in their shoes.

In this lesson, students were encouraged to think about their feelings and emotions. They wrote their responses on footsteps that they placed in a hallway that leads to the middle school. This form of art intervention allowed the rest of the school to get involved as well. Other students walking by would often stop to read and follow the steps, usually touched by the feelings and situations represented there.

Students practiced kindness and compassion, and also celebrated uniqueness in our inclusive community!

Art Intervention Kindness Footsteps Their footsteps in the hallway allow us to walk in their shoes. Their footsteps in the hallway allow us to walk in their shoes.


 

— Astonishing, student-driven behind the scenes

Our students were widely involved in putting on Seussical, The Musical. Middle School students were given the choice to perform or support the behind the scenes through various elective classes during their second trimester, what we call explorations. Some of those who decided to work on the behind scenes were able to design, 3-D print and craft all sorts of props in our Innovation Lab. Others used their artistic skills in the Art Room to create the artwork that served as backdrops during the performances and the cover of the program. Amazing examples of collaboration and creativity, and how we all came together as a community to put on the most colorful, animated show that we have ever created!

Seussical Props

Seussical Props

Seussical Props
By Ambar Pina

— Five winners at the San Mateo County STEM Fair

Congratulations to our 7th grade Sea Crest School representatives at the San Mateo County STEM Fair this past week. The five of them won a recognition at the event!

  • Matthew Spink with his project “True Green Hydro: Expanding the use of hydro electric power by going small and portable” received the honorable mention award in the Engineering category.

San Mateo STEM Fair

  • Callisto Lodwick with her project “Effects of different liquids on amount, pH and specific gravity of urine” received the honorable mention award in the Biological Systems category.
  • Emma Steadman with her project “Cookie Sheet Bake-Off” received the 3rd place award in the Materials Science category.

San Mateo STEM Fair

  • Thomas Cevasco with his project “Is Fresh Air Killing You? Radon: A Deadly Gas” received the 2nd place award in the Earth, Space and Environmental Science category.

San Mateo STEM Fair

  • Olivia Cevasco with her project “Diabetes: A Bloody Mess, Non-Invasive Glucose Testing” received the 1st place award in the Biological Systems category. Olivia will be going to the California State Science Fair, April 24-25 at the California Science Center in Los Angeles.

San Mateo STEM Fair

Many thanks to our incredible Science Teacher, Rob Kashima, for guiding our students to this level of excellence!


 

— Managing our middle schoolers’ screen time and use

By Jessica Patti, Director of Middle School

Our Middle Schoolers are digital natives – they have grown up immersed in technology. However, our students’ familiarity with technology may unintentionally mask their need for guidance with how to engage appropriately with peers in ways that support boundaries and maintain personal integrity. Among Snapchat, messaging, Instagram, and group texting (or grext) there are a myriad of ways for students to connect with one another and share (at times near constant) communication.

While our students are growing up in a social construct that invites sharing profusely, the screen (vs face-to-face) simultaneously creates enough separation such that students’ inhibitions are lessened. This results in exchanges that would be deemed “over-sharing” in person, but are socially acceptable when sent electronically. Middle School is also the time when many parents are grappling with providing a personal device to their child and then with how to monitor use while supporting the emerging adolescent need for perceived “space” and personal privacy.

Here are some helpful tips and things to think about for navigating these sometimes tricky waters:

  • Have regular conversations with your child(ren) about social media.
  • Find out about the new apps they are using and how they are being used.
  • Ask your child to share current examples of how they have recently communicated.
  • Ask if your child has ever had interactions with others on social media that made them uncomfortable and why.

Create clear parameters around social media use:

  • Tell your child what you think is and isn’t appropriate to say and do online. (A helpful framework: If it would be uncomfortable in person, it should not happen on social media.)
  • Explain the difference between bystander and upstander. A bystander may “like” or “favorite” something hurtful an upstander calls out cruel and hurtful behavior and supports targeted students.
  • Let your child know if they may not use certain apps or sites.

Limit access to the device; students should not have cell phone and computer access 24 hours a day.

  • Set a time when you take the device in the evenings and when it is returned in the mornings.
  • Charge personal devices outside of student bedrooms.

Create clear expectations about the expectation of privacy.

  • Have students work on the computer in a communal space in your home.
  • As parents you should decide how frequently you will check the phone.
  • Go through phones and computers together with your child(ren) and talk about topics as they arise.
  • Always ask about new apps or apps you don’t recognize.
  • Have your child(ren) share all passwords for phones, computers and apps.
  • For more extensive resources, Common Sense Media has wonderful information.

For more extensive resources, please visit other related articles from our Parent Education Series: Parenting in a Digital Age, and more to come!


 

Footer background
901 ARNOLD WAY | HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019
CONTACT US
650.712.9892
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR COMMUNITY NEWSLETTER
Sea Crest School is nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, employment practices and all other operations. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, citizenship, national or ethnic origin gender, sexual orientation, or gender identification in the administration of our educational policies, admission policies, tuition assistance programs and athletic or other school-administered programs. © 2018 SEA CREST SCHOOL
Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Linkedin