— The importance of grandparents in the lives of children

 From our Grandparents’ Circle Steering Committee: Kay Beffa, Diane Sikes, Lilia “Toots” Bromley, Theresa Coughlin and Maryann McGuirk, who have been meeting regularly for the past year to create opportunities to honor and involve our grandparents and special friends in meaningful ways at Sea Crest.

Italian Proverb ~“If nothing is going well, call your grandparents.” As with many proverbs handed down through the generations, this one does seem to have some truth!

Grandparents are very important people in the lives of their grandchildren and adult children. “The relationship between grandparents and their grandchildren is second in emotional importance only to the relationship between parent and child,” according to Dr. Karl Pillemer of Cornell University. Having grandparents involved in the lives of children offers tremendous benefits, for both the grandchildren and the grandparents.

Dr. Pillemer writes, “Research shows that as many as 9 out of 10 adult grandchildren feel their grandparents influenced their values and behaviors. Grandparents transmit to their grandchildren the values and norms of social order.” 

Sea Crest School welcomes grandparents on campus and their active involvement with their grandchildren’s school life – by volunteering in the classroom, on field trips, and in activities planned by our Grandparents’ Circle.  And remember that the relationship between these generations offers an important marker for the kids: A chance to be aware of themselves in the long generational line of people that led to them!  

Here are some thoughts we wanted to share with you:

What activities do you do to connect with your grandchildren? 

“We write together, we are writing a book together. We share the love of music, we travel together, my best pal. My older, I don’t see them often, but we communicate.”

“They are paying more attention to texting. If I need to make a connection, I text them. They respond quickly. People complain about texting and new tech, but I like it because it’s instant and an advantage to stay closer.”

“Making yourself available for whatever is needed: pickups, Drs’ appointments… parents are busy. I always try to be there for them.”

“Being on call. He invited me to go to the movies and paid with his card.”

Do you have long-distance grandchildren? How do you connect with them?

“I have 10-12 yr old grandchildren in LA, I created a fund for them, but I also gave them a diary to write down how they are using their money. They didn’t spend much money. I’m trying to teach them money management.”

“I sent my granddaughters a treasure card. One of them bought an Apple watch. We spoil them, but we teach them.”

“We travel together every year to Tahoe. Creating opportunities to have the whole family together if it can happen.”

What values or lessons do you hope to teach your grandchildren?

“Family”

“Social justice”

“Self-confidence”

“They always teach ME something.”

“I believe in the Asian philosophy that passing on my values to reflect them who they are. If you are stubborn and passionate, I like to reflect back what you see and teach them to get to know themselves and stand up for who they are. It’s priceless for both.”

What advice do you have for other grandparents?

“Have one-on-one, thoughtful relationships.”

“Give them their own space, especially those nearby, I always call first.”

“Not to step on the parents’ toes. I’m always careful when giving advice to my grandchildren. You can’t be judgmental.”

“Parents need to vent, but sometimes they are not asking for advice. They are just sharing. They don’t need us to say anything, just listen.”

“Be engaged. This is what we are here for now. Help raise healthy children. Make them feel they are important. Our grandkids’ independence is admirable and deserves respect.”

— Seussical, The Musical

By Dr. Caleb Goh, Director & Choreographer, Theatre Arts Teacher

Mounting a musical is extremely hard work, from the direction, lighting, sets, sound, casting process, budgeting, costumes, rehearsals, and much more. Through the past few months, all of these students acquainted themselves with the intricacies of musical making, whether they were embracing a technical challenge, or focusing on a task from a performance perspective.

The amount of work that went into the production was monumental, and my hope is that you felt the heart, exuberance, and soul, in every movement made, lyric sung, word spoken, and tear shed. Talent is only part of the equation defining musical greatness. Hard work, resilience, and imagination is what makes a show truly shine.

Through the journey of one intrepid elephant, I hope you felt the joy and heart of each performer and student involved in the musical. The passion of every student, performer, crew member, designer, and engineer played a part in making the magic come alive on stage. “A person’s a person, no matter how small”.

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

By Kate Haley Photography

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By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

By Regan Daniels

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By Regan Daniels

By Ambar Pina

By Ambar Pina

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By Ambar Pina


Seussical, The Musical
Thursday, March 9th – Friday, March 10th
Kohrs Family Center
Sea Crest School


— In the News: Sweethearts go dancing

DJ Beech, a seventh grader at Sea Crest School was spinning tunes for the Sweetheart Dance on Saturday night. John Green / Review

Today the Half Moon Bay Review published an article about our Sweetheart Dance on Saturday and how it opens up the fun of a time-honored tradition to all.

By Sarah Griego Guz

Father-daughter dances take on more inclusive flavor.-

For some generations, the mention of a father-daughter dance may evoke memories of young girls in ruffled white socks dancing with Dad while under a shimmering disco ball affixed to the ceiling of the school gym.

Mention a father-daughter dance to most kids attending school on the coast, however, and you might get a shoulder shrug and a blank stare.

Even three years ago, father-daughter dances were considered a relic of the past. Father-daughter dances on the elementary school level did not exist.

Sweetheart Dance Half Moon Bay Review

One reason could be that the definition of family changed. For many girls, a father may be absent from the core unit, replaced by a mother, uncle, grandmother or someone else entirely.

At Sea Crest School, a handful of parents presented the idea of bringing back the father-daughter dance. Director of Lower School Michelle Giacotto had a suggestion.

“When I was first presented the idea of a father-daughter dance, my challenge was, let’s not make it a father-daughter dance, because that’s sort of limiting. So that’s how the dance turned to ‘sweetheart,’” she said. “That was what we were trying to do, to have the tradition of a father-daughter dance that many parents remember when they were kids, but make it more inclusive.”

What happened next was such a sweet thing that many of the other schools followed suit.

Over the past two weeks, El Granada, Hatch and Sea Crest schools have hosted sweetheart dances, with little girls coming to the dance with a chosen person they consider to be their sweetheart.

“My daughter June was really excited to go because all her friends were going. So I said, ‘Sure, I’ll take you,’” said Sea Crest parent Heidi Bennett, whose husband happened to be on a ski trip with their son. “It was really nice that there was a mix of families there to celebrate the girls.

“There were a few couples, a mother and a father, who brought a daughter,” she continued. “There were maybe a handful of moms who brought a daughter, and it was totally not a big deal.”

Business trips and other travel schedules prohibited some dads from joining the dance.

In those cases, moms sprang to the rescue, getting dolled up along with their daughters and enjoying a nice meal before hitting the dance floor.

“My daughter got to wear a little bit of lipstick and a little bit of sparkly eyeshadow,” laughed Bennett. “We did our hair and our fingernails and we went out to dinner first.”Many of the pint-sized dancers were amazed by the transformation of the Kohrs Family Center, which featured a photo booth as well as a treat table laden with a plethora of sweets.

The funky photo booth, complete with oversized neon glasses, hats and other accessories, was set up in a section of the building.

Fathers, daughters — and mothers — took time out from dancing to document the evening with a funny photo.

“I think it was really good and really fun,” said second-grade Sea Crest student Madeleine Willits who attended the dance with her father, Chris. “They had cookies, cupcakes, candy and you get to make your goodie bags.

“My favorite part,” she continued, “was taking pictures and dancing with my friends.”

Besides inclusion, another benefit is that the cost of the tickets goes directly to the school.

 


 

— Spanish program

By Fco. Javier “Cali” Calderón and Paulina Hidalgo, Spanish Teachers

One of our primary approaches to engaging our students in our Spanish language instruction is through the use of Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling (TPRS), which is a best-practice methodology that emphasizes language acquisition through oral storytelling and active response from learners while providing comprehensible input. Students quickly become engaged in the process of story creation listening to and speaking en español (video).

SpanishThis engaging, student centered and immersive approach mirrors the natural way that children acquired their primary language. For example, this is the same approach used by nationally recognized organizations such as the San Francisco Giants in the teaching of English to their Spanish speaking players (video).

Currently in our Spanish program this methodology can be seen in both the lower school and middle school classrooms with activities such as cartoon strip story writing, picture sequencing, group story creation incorporating total physical response (TPR) while using appropriate verb conjugation and topic-specific vocabulary. We continue to use this effective technique of natural language acquisition into middle school as a bridge to more elevated age appropriate content.

SpanishRecently in the middle school seventh graders created art inspired by their own written “Prompt Journals” as a means of improving their communicative practice through a controlled prompt of specific grammar concepts enhanced through their art. Eighth graders expressed their creativity after doing a poetry breakdown of renowned Argentine writer/poet Jorge Luis Borges’ poem “Instantes” (video).

SpanishStudents were asked to write their own poems from the perspective of the 85-year-old in Borges’ work, while viewing an ordinary wall with extraordinary eyes. The wall served as a metaphor of the lives that these students have lived. This supported their studies of the pretérito (past) tense while spurring their own creative interpretations in a back to the future way.

This task-based approach is intended to support development of our students’ sense of self-efficacy in the process of acquiring a second language by refining their ear for the language whilst improving their reading and writing in the target language.


 

 

— Wildlife Associates and their Creepy Critters visited our school

The Wildlife Associates visited our school last week, and they brought their creepy yet wonderful creatures for an assembly full of awws and wows!

This event was a special thank you to all fifth-grade students and families who helped with the Harvest Party set-up back in September. Wildlife Associates was very appreciative and brought us their fantastic Creepy Critter assembly: a boa constrictor, a tortoise, an alligator, a tarantula and a monitor lizard!

Fifth Grade Volunteers Wildlife Associates

Through this event, K-8 students were able to explore the gentler side of the most misunderstood animals of the wild kingdom, dispel myths and learn the important roles these animals have in nature’s diverse web of life. What a wonderful opportunity for our students to know the significance of all living things, even the “creepy” ones!

Wildlife Associates Creepy Critters Wildlife Associates Creepy Critters
Wildlife Associates Creepy Critters Wildlife Associates Creepy Critters Wildlife Associates Creepy Critters Wildlife Associates Creepy Critters

Thanks to the Wildlife Associates for sharing with us all their knowledge and bringing their Creepy Critters!


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