— In the News: Farmers market unit sprouts ideas for community, business

Published in the Half Moon Bay Review on June 14th.

Sea Crest students ground learning at farmers market. By Sara Hayden.

Farmers Market

The Sea Crest School first-grade farmers market was a chance for kids to do some hands-on learning

Out of the fog came sparks of color at Sea Crest School — blushing nectarines and cherries, blue hydrangeas in mason jars and purple eggplants no bigger than a palm. With the sharp tang of garlic in the air, first-graders gathered on a cool Friday morning to manage their school’s annual Box Town Market and sell their wares.

It was the last event of their social studies unit. They had rolled up their sleeves and dug into the dirt, planting fresh lettuce, beets and carrots, connecting the food on their tables to the ground in which it’s grown, as well as others who would eat it.

Farmers Market“It’s all about self and how we fit into the world,” teacher Stephanie Hanepen said. “We talk about what makes Half Moon Bay such a unique community to live in … We talk about seeds, planting, weeding, watering, harvesting.”

“They get a grip on and an exposure to one of the things I see as one of the miracles of the world,” said Coastside Farmers Market manager and Half Moon Bay Farmer of the Year Erin Tormey, who had the honor of cutting a ribbon to kick off the event. “It’s such a holistic, healthy thing … There’s work involved, there’s science, there’s effort and attention. I think they get that early on.”

Students managing such stands as Baking & Taking (selling gluten-free baked goods, hummus and Sea Crest-grown lettuce) and Awesome Everything (boasting duct tape wallets and packs of handmade greeting cards) carefully counted dollar bills and quarters in exchange for their homegrown goods.

Farmers Market

They donated proceeds to support Market Match, an incentive program for people to buy wholesome foods.

First-grader Autumn Seaborn showed off fresh apricots, leeks, plums and pumpkin bread.

“Everyone wants peaches,” said Seaborn, working quickly to meet queuing customers’ demands.

“It was really fun,” Paxton Holden chimed in. “When we first planted, it was really small, but then it gets really big, and it’s surprising.”

Ashleigh Evans was also proud of what she had grown with her business partners.

“I feel awesome because we grew all this for a while,” Evans said. “I hope people like the taste of them.”


 

— In the News: Sports participation nears 100 percent for 6th- and 7th-graders at Sea Crest

Sea Crest School fifth- through eighth-graders gathered in the school gym for the end-of-year sports recognition assembly last week. Photo courtesy Ambar Pina.

Published in the Half Moon Bay Review on June 14th.

A unique approach to play. By Sarah Griego Guz.

In early June, Sea Crest School hosted a special athletics recognition assembly. The Kohrs Family Center erupted into thunderous applause as the coaches reflected on the banner year.

The girls volleyball and soccer teams as well as both the girls seventh- and eighth-grade baseball teams had earned championship titles. The golf team had also won a championship.

Even more impressive than the highlights was the school’s philosophy: Sports should be accessible to everyone, and all students should be able to take risks while learning something new.

This is not an “everybody plays” approach. Students who have put in the time to master athletic techniques are rewarded with increased playing time and opportunities to play at a high level.

The athletic department, however, has mastered the art of allowing all students to participate without compromising the degree of competiveness needed to win championships.

“Sea Crest Athletics has a no-cut policy and a philosophy of participation stemming from our daily P.E. program where risk-taking is not only encouraged but also celebrated,” said Craig Strong, director of athletics at Sea Crest School in an emailed statement. “We regularly ask students to take risks by giving a particular sport a try and see how it goes. We have generally had a very high participation rate because of this philosophy.

“Sea Crest Athletics relies on the participation of our fifth-grade and middle school students,” he continued. “This year, once again, we had great participation from our student athletes.”

The school experienced participation levels of 94 percent for fifth grade, 99.5 percent for sixth grade and 99.5 percent for all seventh-grade students. The total participation rate for all middle school and fifth-grade students slid in at 95 percent.

The impressive level of participation was evident when the last student athlete was called to the stage to be recognized — the section of the gym where the middle school students had been sitting was virtually empty.

“Children often play a sport because they feel part of something. They want to be included and be part of what all their friends are doing,” said Strong.

Strong also feels that including fifth-graders in the middle school athletics program not only provides an opportunity for students to get a taste of athletics, it also provides them with a foundation resulting in a stronger program overall.

“Including fifth-graders in our middle school program has proven to capture the attention of students due to the level of enthusiasm at this age,” said Strong. “Once we have them engaged, we focus on player development to give them the skills to be able to continue playing at the next level.

“As our athletes begin to develop a passion for a particular sport, we continue to encourage them to play as many sports as they can manage,” he continued. “And, as our students end up in the upper grades, they typically have an extra year of experience from their fifth-grade season, leading us to the number of competitive teams at the varsity or A level.”


 

— Seventh graders volunteered sorting out food at Coastside Hope

Coastside Hope Coastside Hope Coastside Hope Coastside HopeThe 7th grade visited Coastside Hope’s warehouse on Tuesday, June 6th. The purpose of the visit was to unload and sort over 35 barrels of food. The students worked tirelessly pulling barrels off pallets, emptying those barrels onto tables, and checking dates on all of the products they were sorting. Overall it was a very productive day. It was a collective effort with each student doing their best and using their strengths to help each other. With all of their hard work, Coastside Hope will now be able to hand out the food to families in need on the Coast.

 

Here is just some of what the students took away from this field trip…

“Fun, nice to help. It was hard work”
~Callisto

“ It was inspiring to see how much would or could get done as a group. It helped us work together and collectively collaborate”
~Shea

“It felt good that every can I packed helped a family”
~Mari

“It made me feel good because I was helping people who may have less than me”
~Ryan M.

 


 

— Third grade hosted their Annual Entrepreneur Fair and raised money to save the wetlands

The Third Grade hosted their Annual Entrepreneur Fair on Thursday, June 1st, during the night of the Community Open House. This sale is part of their economics unit in an effort to earn money to save the wetlands.

Early in the Spring, students initiated their projects: conducted research, taking market surveys and interviewing other entrepreneurs, started to learn important concepts and finalized their business ideas. Once they had their business ventures approved, they soon began manufacturing or preparing the parts of their service, purchasing business licenses, choosing rental spaces, creating advertisements, and making business cards and thank you receipts. Students even got a loan from Sea Crest for petty cash in preparation for the Open House.

Third graders donated all the money raised from the Entrepreneur Fair to the Coastside Land Trust in an effort to help save the wetlands –We are so proud of them!

Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Wetlands Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit Entrepreneur Fair Economics Unit


 

— After school spotlight: Judo class

This year in JAWS, our Extended Day Program has provided a wide range of opportunities for students to learn and develop their social, emotional and physical development. We recognize that each student has different interests and we strive to support their individuality. Our focus is to model positive behaviors such as responsibility, accountability, and to respect all things and people. Sketching, i-Lab, Chess Club, Band Jam and Glee Club were a few of the classes we offered this year.

Our “Spot Light” class this year has been our Judo Class. Judo is a Japanese word meaning “gentle way,” and is a type of martial art that comes from the ancient Japanese martial art of jujitsu, meaning “yielding way” in which the object is to throw, hold to the ground, or otherwise force an opponent to submit, using the minimum of physical effort. Dr. Tekakwitha Pernambuco-Wise, who holds a third-degree black belt in Judo and was an international competitor and national champion for Guiana, has spent this year with a group of students teaching the ways of Judo. The class ran once a week throughout the school year for grades 4th through 8th.

After School Judo After School Judo After School Judo


 

 

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